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SELF Spaces-2012

A Visual Anthropology Screening & Exhibition

In this year’s combined screening and photography exhibition we witnessed a tremendous amount of creativity and commitment to wide anthropological engagement.

The photographic exploration of Self S P A C E S took place in the foyer of the Marlowe Building.  Comprising a mixture of students’ final projects and coursework, the subjects ranged from explorations of self and other, to documenting the transformation from animal to meat in an abattoir, to photographic explorations of museum curation.  A steady stream of viewers took time to admire the work (including some of our local builders, who were thoroughly impressed!) and the high quality of work was commented on by many.  The judges had an incredibly hard time deciding on the prizes for each of the categories, and after an hour of deliberation, the only way they could reach a consensus was to add an extra prize.  Congratulations to the following winners:

Most Innovative Use of Photography – Harriet Thomas for her project ‘Hair and Identity’

Best Anthropological Context – Freya Williams for her project on Stonewalling in North Wales

Best Overall Photograph – Special Commendation – Matt Bullard for ‘Pig in an Abattoir’

Best Overall Photograph Winner – Holly Turner for her set ‘Brutiful Derby Girls’

The video project students presented their video shorts in a full afternoon of screenings, discussions and finally the awarding of prizes. Each group of films was introduced by Kate Moore before the films were shown back to back. The directors then answered questions as a panel, picking up on themes that linked their films. The judges included Roger Just, Glenn Bowman and last year’s winner of the Roger Just Award for Visual Anthropology, Max Harrison. Hugh Brody awarded his prize for Visual Anthropology by video.

The Roger Just Prize for Visual Anthropology went to Nazly Dehganiazar for her film ‘Canterbury’s Buskers’. The Runner Up Prize was awarded to Natalie Bonet for ‘Sundays on the Southbank’.

The Hugh Brody Prize for Visual Anthropology was awarded to Harriet Kendall for ‘Voices from the Back Seat’. The runner up award went to Sarine Arslanian for ‘Connecting Strings: Armenian Spirit in London’.

Harriet Kendall’s film also won the audience prize with joint runners up awards going to Wilhelm Hodnebo’s ‘Tony’ and Gabrielle Fenton’s ‘In Dover, the Border’.

To see all the films and learn more about the context and reasons for their making please click on the links below:

Who are we?

Fish, Chips & Change — Lazlo Hewitt & Jania Kudaibergen

Connecting Strings: Armenian Spirit in London–Sarine Arslanian   (Hugh Brody Prize-Runner Up)

Student Diet—Anja Hoffmann

Walk Like a Man— Francesca Wicks & Natalie Freeman

Where are we?

In Dover, The Border — Gabrielle Fenton         (Audience Prize-Joint Runner Up)

Among Hectic: Buskers in Canterbury High Street— Sabrina Pascoe

Sundays on the Southbank— Natalia Garcia Bonet      (Roger Just Prize-Runner Up)

Liminalities……

We Need to Talk about Abortion— Charlotte Claesson

Underwater Nation— Rachel Singer Meier

Invisible People – Berta Norman

Voices from the Back Seat – Harriet Kendall           (Hugh Brody Prize & Audience Prize)

Through Our Eyes

Tony– Wilhelm Hodnebo                                                (Audience Prize-Joint Runner Up)

Canterbury’s Buskers– Nazly Dehganiazar                          (Roger Just Prize)

Seeing Comes Before Words—Aimee Tollan

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  1. Peopling Places | UK Visual Anthropology

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