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INTER-REFLEXIONS-2014

 

Reflexion– expression without words; a remark expressing careful consideration; a calm, lengthy, intent consideration.

Inter– Between, among; mutually; reciprocally

 

Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1, University of Kent, Tuesday, 3rd June, 1-7pm

 

This year’s screening and exhibition of third year visual anthropology projects was titled Inter-Reflexions. The organisation of the screening programme made more explicit how our students’ projects speak to each other as much as they do to the wide issues they engage with. They testify to the processes of collaboration and feedback they followed and inspiration they took from teaching in visual anthropology theory in the Autumn term.

In this yearly event we celebrate our students commitment to creative use of photography and video that takes visual anthropological methodologies into engagement with the issues and interests that inspire and fascinate them.

 

Timetable

 

Matthew, Chelsey and Liam answer questions about their films.

Matthew, Chelsey and Liam answer questions about their films.

For the screening we started with the body’s most symbolised extension into the space that surrounds us in Matthew Neale’s Hair, a critical exploration of the meanings of hair and hair products. The student experience also featured strongly in Hollie Goman’s intimate enquiry into what university means to students, in The Art of Growing Up. In an altogether more imagined and playful space of magic and alternative use of university spaces, Jake Conley and Chelsey Jacobs, entered into the games of the Harry Potter inspired university club, The Hogwarts Society. By contrast, Liam Dorr took us off campus in an ethnofiction inspired film on one student’s plan for the perfect party. Ongka’s Big Moka was the inspiration, but Joel’s Big Party is a lot funnier.

From the student ‘hair’ and the now we moved to the theme of eternity and longevity in shorts that tackled religion, activism and laughter. Christiane Howe deepened our appreciation of arranged and sometimes fortuitous marriages in The Unification Movement. Annabelle Spooner travelled to South Korean churches in the UK to see the challenges they face in Yeswhonim.

In Of Families and Eternity, Robert Malin delivered new insights from behind the doors of the Mormon church. In fighting for the continued use of their skatepark on the Southbank, the activists that Henry Worger collaborated with in Culture with a Capital U, also desire a sense of continuity and longevity.  Troy King’s The Act of Laughter delved deeply into the challenges of being a stand up comedian and found strong links with anthropology.

Dr Oliver Double, who starred in Troy King’s film, dropped in to contribute further insights into stand up comedy.

 

Photo Exhibition

In the break we had the opportunity to look at the photographic exhibition. It covered similarly wide-ranging topics, exploring a range of photographic techniques within anthropology as well as diverse visual subjects. From the performance of gender and sexuality, to the effect of moving into a retirement home, to the emotional journey of a mixed-martial arts fighter as he prepares for, and takes part in, the biggest fight of his career, the photographic projects asked how, as researchers, we can explore and depict the encounters with life that make up the human experience using photography. This year’s photographers were: Alice Keegan, Lewis Batterham, Jamie Baird, Ayla Jay, Joanna Jones, Sarah Graham, Thomas Lindsay, Rebecca Scutcher, Keira Henderson, Daven Nijran-Talwar, Lydia Hill and Monique Dray.

 

Jesse Tomlinson answers questions on Cornish Identity.

Jesse Tomlinson answers questions on Cornish Identity.

We returned from the break to the themes of home, place and identity, linked in a series of shorts that travel from Cornwall to Canterbury’s Good’s Shed, to London protests against homelessness, to a novel exploration of the idea of stress and ending with one man’s fight with mental illness. Jesse Tomlinson tested claims for Cornish identity in Ve Bos Kernewek in a short in which he was also tested. In Localised, Oliver Seary took us to the heart and soul of local produce, through evocative visual portraits of traders from the Good’s Shed. Experimental in format with a challenging message, Mike Cadby, delivered a novel framing of the challenge of homelessness in Life’s a Beach. Scott Skinner addressed the question of how the idea of stress effects us using a key TED talk as a vehicle propelled by anthropological interest in the reception of media. A Stressful Perception aims to transform the audience’s perceptions. In Fragments of a Life, Simon Schwarz took us into the home of one man and their journey of facing mental illness through the camera.

Our final group of films shifted more deeply into the theme of reflection. In A Journey Into Landscape & Tourism in Aljezur, Alex Woodcock, journeyed to Portugal to meditate on a village where most of the population now live in cities.

 

In Transient Reflections, Becci Geach translated the experience of being human in moving trains into a visual aesthetic that linked us to fellow passengers. Piano Talk, focused on the destination. Helen Peek explored the reasons why people come from far and wide to play the pianos in King’s Cross Station. Naomi Webb’s Running Monologue, was a strikingly personal portrayal structured by a powerfully moving motif. Sam Parsons’ gravity defying film, Leave it on the Ground, opened up the social and personal motivations of sky divers and concluded our afternoon.

This concluded the screening part of the day.

David Pick and Hugh Brody discuss the films during the break.

David Pick and Hugh Brody discuss the films during the break.

This year we welcomed back Professor Hugh Brody to award the prize in his name. We were also excited to learn how the Tracks Across Sand project has developed since last year. Tracks Across Sand is a major video project that looks the history of the first indigenous land claim in Africa. Last year he started a major fundraising initiative to fund the dissemination of the film and to create an online resource. This year he confirmed that he has got funding to screen the film all over the African continent and to set up an archive at the University of Cape Town.

This year we also welcomed a new judge for the screening to award the David Pick Documentary Prize. In a career spanning more than three decades, David Pick produced and directed hundreds of television programmes in the UK, mainly for ITV. From science magazines (The Real World) to religious/ethical affairs documentaries (The Human Factor); from a twice-weekly live soap opera (Together) to filmed family comedy (Worzel Gummidge); from documentaries like The Tigers’ Tale, chronicling the excavation of The Channel Tunnel, to The Hannibal Test, which followed Ian Botham and elephants on a charity trek across the Alps.

Are Mothers Really Necessary?, a seven-part series for Channel 4 on the work of the controversial child-psychiatrist, Dr John Bowlby, was focused on three of his major studies: Attachment, Separation and Loss. The filming presented many practical and ethical challenges to the documentary-maker: in a residential unit for children suffering the effects of severe emotional and/or physical abuse; in day-care centres for babies and toddlers; in a preparatory boarding school; in the mother-and-baby units of British and American prisons; in the cancer wards of children’s hospitals; and with grieving parents in a children’s hospice. Since retiring from TV, David has studied Creative Writing, taking two modules of a part-time BA at UKC before joining the MA programme at Christ Church Canterbury, where he gained a distinction. His first novel, Mrs May: A PsychoSexual Odyssey, tells the story of a primary schoolteacher’s mission to redeem a teenage thug, once a delightful child in her reception class. Mrs May is available as a paperback or e-book on Amazon.

In the dialogue between Hugh Brody and David Pick we hoped to find the creative tension and possibilities between the increasingly blurred boundaries of ethnographic and documentary filmmaking.

Sarah receives her award from Maria-Paz and Glenn.

Sarah receives her award from Maria-Paz and Glenn.

The photography prizes were judged by Glenn Bowman and Maria-Paz Peirano.  Maria-Paz Peirano is a PhD student researching Chilean cinema. Glenn Bowman is a reader of social anthropology at the University of Kent, Director of the Liberal Arts programme and a visual anthropologist who uses photography extensively in his research in Jerusalem and the Occupied Territories of Palestine, Macedonia and Cyprus.

To see photos of the day please click on our Flickr photostream.

Photography  Prizes

Photography prizes went to the following:

Most innovative use of photography: Sarah Graham for ‘Threads of History’

Anthropological Vision: Jamie Baird for ‘The evolution of Murals in East Belfast’

Best overall photographs: Joanna Jones for ‘Timberlina: an anthropological case study of a contemporary drag artist’

The photography exhibition can be viewed online here.

Video Prizes

 

The David Pick Prize was accepted by Peter McCulloch of 'Fragments of a Life'.

The David Pick Prize was accepted by Peter McCulloch of ‘Fragments of a Life’.

David Pick Prize –Fragments of a LifeSimon Schwarz

Peter McCulloch, the key protagonist and collaborator in Simon’s film received the prize in his absence.

David Pick Runner Up- Localised–  Oliver Seary

Special Commendation- The Unification Movement–  Christiane Howe      

Christiane Howe receives a special commendation.

 

Hugh Brody Prize –Running MonologueNaomi Webb

Hugh Brody Runner Up Prize- Joel’s Big PartyLiam Dorr

Audience Prize-Fragments of a Life–Simon Schwarz

 

Liam Dorr receives an award for 'Joel's Big Party'.

Liam Dorr receives an award for ‘Joel’s Big Party’.

If you would like to see photographs of the event please look at our Flickr feed. Our thanks to Caroline Bennett and Mike Poltorak for the considerable work organising the exhibition and screening.

Photographs by Caroline Bennett and Mike Poltorak.

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