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Transparencies 2018

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Invitation to Caremotions 2017

May 18, 2017

ukvisualanth

CAREMOTION –noun- finding balance between the care of others and self, and the emotions during video making.

Etymology-(coined Canterbury 2017) a synthesis of care, motion, emotion, motion picture and commotion.

 

Please join us on the 31st May for a screening of visual anthropology projects that demonstrate the remarkable creativity and engagement of our visual anthropology students at the School of Anthropology and Conservation.

The twelve films will be shown in three thematic parts, after each there will be a opportunity for discussion and Q and A.

Professor Hugh Brody continues his long support of visual anthropology at Kent and will award the Hugh Brody Visual Anthropology Prize.

We welcome visiting Professor Daw-Ming Lee from Taiwan who will award a prize in his name. He is a reknowned academic and filmmaker and will be

giving a talk about his work on the 24th May.

The Lynn-Bicker foundation led by Alan Bicker will award a Public Engagement Prize. There will also be an audience prize.

After the event we will move to the Gulbenkian for post screening drinks and pot-luck.

Screenshot from Painting a Journey (Evleen Price)

Painting: Andrew Price

Invitation to Portrails 2016

May 20, 2016

ukvisualanth

 

 

Portrayal – a depiction of someone or something in a work of art or literature; a picture
Trail – a mark or a series of signs or objects left behind by the passage of someone or something.

Join us for the screening of final year visual anthropology projects. Students focussed on a remarkable diversity of themes this year with a strong common focus on the portrayal of groups or particular people.

Four prizes will be awarded this year
The Hugh Brody Visual Anthropology Prize
The Virginia Pitts Prize
The Public Engagement Prize (The Lynn Bicker Foundation)
Audience Prize

All audience member will be able to vote for the audience prize but only if they have viewed all films.

Picture Credit-Lissa Davies (The Cast)

‘Silence is golden/but my eyes still see’: Award winning documentary ‘The Silence of the Flies’

Project

In December 2015 the School of Anthropology and Conservation was privileged to welcome alumnus Gonzalo Chacon for a screening and discussion of the award winning documentary ‘The Silence of the Flies’ for which he was co-executive producer.  Guest contributor James Kloda reviews the film below.   All images included are courtesy of NorteSur Producciones.  

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“Silence is golden/But my eyes still see.”

This refrain from The Four Seasons’ song is both haunted and haunting, its stated serenity mere illusion. Similarly, Eliezer Arias’ documentary, The Silence Of The Flies, has a lingering disquietude hanging over its subject of multiple suicide, predominantly amongst young adults, in rural Venezuela. Organised by Dr Caroline Bennett, the School was delighted to welcome the film’s executive producer, MA in Visual Anthropology alumnus Gonzalo Chacon, to introduce the screening and participate in a Q & A session, proving to be an engaging, thought-provoking evening.

Arias follows the stories of two ladies, Marcelina and Mercedes, whose daughters tragically took their own lives. One, María José, was a spiky, rebellious character who despised the inherent chauvinism of the society surrounding her, defiantly coming out much to the disgust of her father: the other, Nancy, remains far more enigmatic, any allusions to troubled personality reflected in the figure of her devoted sister, who herself tried to commit suicide when she was eight months pregnant. The dichotomy of silence is drawn thus: present absence and absent presence. And silence is very much the thematic heart of the film, for what typifies this seemingly phenomenological outbreak of self-sacrifice is the cloak of hush wrapped around it.

12315250_10156288237175287_903556283_o-2            Similar to Joshua Oppenheimer’s recent documentary The Look Of Silence, which followed an Indonesian optometrist confronting the perpetrators of his country’s 1965 genocidal purge, the precise challenge of Arias’ film is to dramatise that dichotomy of silence. Stories are heard in voiceover against images of their narrators, silent in frame but always staring into the lens, searching it, and us, for answers or a means to express their private tragedies. The effect of this disconnect is persuasive, a voice only able to be candid when disembodied from its speaker.

12299486_10156288236685287_2002026562_o-2The images themselves are desolate, vast pockets of empty space pushing compositional detail to the fringe leaving a void centre-frame: figures are almost exclusively shot in isolation and, when a group is seen together, it is always from a distance. Perhaps the most striking articulation of the palpable absence at the heart of these communities is of a frozen photograph depicting María José filling the screen as the sound of her brother scrubbing down walls prior to decorating scratches metronomically on the soundtrack: a face etched domineeringly in close-up to the tune of attempted erasure.

12311434_10156288236250287_1855006345_o-2            The Silence Of The Flies is not always this gracefully lyrical. Indeed, some of its more stylised imagery seems too studied: dew drops fall from drooping leaves as Polaroids of victims float down streams. And whilst the lack of objective narration allows us to relate directly to troubled biography, it sometimes becomes difficult to understand whose story we are now following.

Yet there is so much to tell, clamouring to get out to reach some form of resolution, that confusion is perhaps inevitable. With questions still so present and answers wholly absent, The Silence Of The Flies ends with a montage of faces now with eyes closed, meditating, perhaps beginning to find some kind of peace now that hush has been broken. For a brief moment, silence is golden.

Funding Opportunity for MA & PhD–Deadline Looming

January 17, 2012

ukvisualanth

We have a unique opportunity for home and EU students to do a fully funded MA and PhD at our school.

The deadline is looming, so if you are interested please read the further details here and submit your application.