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Posts tagged ‘sensory experience’

Resolutionaries 2019

Project

Matt Rose introduces the event with a poem.

 

Welcome and thank you for coming.  Before the films get up and running I’d like to invite us all to reflect on why we’re here and why we should care. The ideas shared today bare directly from the socially bound places and inherent relations that each film maker found themselves in. From Emilia’s discovery of the wasted abundance in bins to the experiences of reclaiming stolen power reflected by Kim. Through the woodlands and music venues of Canterbury, to the daily realities of several Greece based refugees this journey will take us through the moments of lives embodied to us through the camera’s eye. In the manifestations of what each found you will find a range of reactions to the interrelated social situations by which we’re bound. Although divided by geographical locations our films share a specific space in time and today we come together to reflect on where we’ve got to, as a rapidly dying planet inhabited by divided people, inherently unequal, these films speak to the realities that many go through – some positive, others much less so. As a planet we have many issues to solve and too much lonesome focus on this can become a minefield to behold. But together we are strong. Let the recent extinction rebellion remind us of the power of collective action against that which is wrong. And perhaps together we can come a step closer to embodying the, title of this event: Resolutionaries. Now I think that all that’s left to say is a big thank you to our judges: the alumni, Yasmin Fedda and Hugh Brody. Thank you very much, and enjoy.

 

To watch the films and learn more about them please click on the below links.

To get a taste of all the films in order watch our trailer:

To see which films won awards scroll down.

 

 

 

 

THE PROGRAMME

The Tree Lover                 Alex Clay
Lady Luck                    Gavin Knight

Technologically Ill         Noemie Degiorgis

Sofi MX                  Ghislaine Howard

 

 

L to R-Ghislaine Howard, Alex Clay, Gavin Knight, Noemie Degiorgis

 

RECREATE

Warmth Through Movement            Carolina Rodriquez-Navarro
In the Making                           Stella Pitsillidou
Under the Archways                         Tom Banks
F.I.L.T.H                                             Hana Jeal

Tom Banks and Hana Jeal

 

RECLAIM

Who Am We?                        Meredith Ament
Ms                                                  Lizzie Millard
Catholicist                                       Lucy Evans
Flowering Rapeseed      Kimberley Ubendran
What’s Eating Tom                  Thomas Milroy

 

L to R- Kimberley Ubendran, Lizzie Millard, Thomas Milroy, Lucy Evans, Meredith Ament

 

REBEL

Whose Future? Whose Climate?    Matt Rose
Appropriating Icons              Georgios Ntazos
Fashion Swarm                    Georgia Buckland
Bins to Banquets                   Emilia Brumpton

L to R-Matt Rose, Emilia Brumpton, Georgios Ntazos, Georgia Buckland

 

 

 

 

RECEPTION and REACTIONS

THE AWARDS

Public Engagement Prize
Dedicated to Lynn Bicker &
Martin Ripley -Awarded by Rob
Fish

 

Georgia Buckland receiving the Public Engagement Prize from Dr Rob Fish, Director of Research in SAC.

Awarded for the website Future Fashion Index

 

New Horizons Prize
Awarded by Dr Yasmin Fedda

 

Ghislaine Howard receives a Special Commendation from Dr Yasmin Fedda

 

Hana Jeal receives the New Horizons Prize awarded by Dr Yasmin Fedda

 

New Horizons Prize- Hana Jeal for F.I.L.T.H

New Horizons Special Commendation- Ghislaine Howard for Sofi MX

 

Alumni Prize
Awarded by Francesca Tesler &
Johannes Walter

 

 

Emilia Brumpton receives a special commendation.

Kimberly Ubendran receives the Alumni Prize

Alumni Prize-Kimberly Ubendran for Flowering Rapeseed

Alumni Special Commendation-Emilia Brumpton for  Bins to Banquets

 

 

 

Hugh Brody Visual Anthropology Prize
Awarded by Professor Hugh Brody

Watch Professor Hugh Brody’s commentary on all the films here.

 

Thomas Milroy receives a special commendation from Professor Hugh Brody.

Noemie Degiorgis receives the Hugh Brody Visual Anthropology Prize

 

 

 

For wonderful photography in the dark we thank- Ollie (Oliver) Trapnell

Visualising the body

November 9, 2012

Siroccosky

‘Then tell me who that

me is, or the

you understood, the any of us….’

(excerpt from Human Atlas by Marianne Boruch)

.

A couple of months ago I had to have an operation.  On fieldwork in Cambodia at the time, I flew to Bangkok, and following a couple of uncomfortably contained weeks in hospital, I was discharged from hospital clutching a folder brimming with papers – the record of my time in hospital.  A few weeks later, on a sweaty afternoon in Phnom Penh, I sat looking through the folder and came across a CD of pre-operative CT scans.  As I flicked through the images, I started thinking about my perception and conception of my body and its place in my interactions in the world, something I had become acutely aware of through being sick.

As anthropologists we are encouraged to reflect on our position within our work.  But I had not really considered the place of my body within my research beyond its colour and gender.  Thinking about the body is nothing new to anthropology of course; in 1935 Mauss wrote about the body as a tool for experiencing the world, and hundreds of others have examined it since, but as I considered the scans, I started to think about the place of the visual in this articulation.  I spent the afternoon examining each image, fascinated by this exotic presentation of my self, at once both recognisable and completely alien.  A central method in anthropology is the decentralisation of the self; that movement in perception back and forth between the known and the unknown, from that which is familiar to that which is not.  Looking through the images I found myself experiencing this othering, and thus contemplating how we know our physical selves – our bodies – our ultimate research tools through which we interact, communicate and contemplate.

CT scan of my mid and upper thorax

The physicality of the body is often de-emphasised in social anthropology in favour of approaches that examine the culturally constructed meanings inscribed on it, the symbolic aesthetics presented, or the performance of power that the body enables for example.  But as I slowly recovered in the unbearable heat and humidity of Phnom Penh, the physicality of my own body was impossible to evade; it was impossible to think of the understanding of my body as simply a product of specific social, cultural and historical perspectives.  Kirmayer argued that the body provides a ‘structure of thought that is, in part, extra-rational and disorderly’ due to its relation to emotional, aesthetic and moral worlds; my thought processes and engagement with the world and others within it were entirely disorderly at this time due to their connection to the physical and the altered control of agency of myself and others on my body.  Examining the images, meanwhile, made me contemplate the relationship between the visual and the body: how much of our understanding of the body (our own and others) is influenced by what we see and how those images are presented, particularly in a medical setting?

These images were central to the relationships I became enmeshed in during this period.  They also marked a distinct interplay of power relations.  In his 1991 examination of terror in Northern Ireland, Feldman argued that power is embedded in the body and thus the body is an instrument of agency in power relations.  Whilst I am not suggesting that my experiences are anything resembling those faced by people in Northern Ireland during the troubles, I certainly became aware of the power the body wielded – both to myself and to others – and it was through the imaging that power was often articulated.  I lost the power of control and interpretation of my body and others gained it – only certain doctors could take the pictures, certain others could read those images, whilst still others could decide the actions taken on me.  My ‘docile body’, to steal Foucault’s term, caused a period of ontological insecurity which lasted some time and it seemed, as I contemplated these images, that it was initially through the visual that I began to regain power over my body, and my feeling of self.

Cross-sectional scans of upper legs showing femoral-pelvic articulation (left) and pelvis showing iliac-sacral joints (right)

The interactions that occurred in the hospital, although in Thailand, were firmly embedded within Western medico-legal theories and histories.  I wondered how a spirit-medium or soothsayer in Cambodia would interpret the pictures (particularly as I first got sick whilst visiting a mass grave), or how others would interpret them as a layperson.  The images of my body were not simple transmitters of information.  They were articulations of power, tools of communication, mechanisms of thought.  As I travelled through my body, via the CT images, I experienced an odd disjuncture: my inners looked alien and animal-like and brought to mind the dehumanisation I had felt whilst in hospital.  At the same time I felt belonging: I recognised elements of a body that exists only inside me – my peculiarly crooked spine for example, which bends at the top of my lumbar vertebrae, but which is invisible from outside to another person.  I made a journey in understanding of my body from pure physicality and hyper-awareness of its workings to aesthetic appreciation and awareness of its symbolic nature.

Now several weeks on I am intrigued by the process my body has gone through, and part of my reflecting on this caused me to produce the visual journey through my body that you can see here.  There is a form of Buddhist sect in Thailand that attempts to understand the cosmos by meditating over the corpse.  Perhaps I am performing some such form of meditation; right now this period is central to my fieldwork experience and has informed my initial interactions with Cambodia.  How does the way I use and view my body affect my communication and relationships with others and therefore my research?  Have the physicalities and resultant impact on my sense of being affected my sense of self and therefore how I interact in the world?  Certainly they did at the start.  The images and charts provided a shared language to certain members of my social circle and were completely exclusionary to others including, at first, myself.  What effect has this had on my understanding of my place in my fieldsite?

Mandible exposed through the soil at mass grave

Exposed mandible at Choeung Ek mass grave, Cambodia

My current research looks at contemporary understandings of and relationships with mass graves in Cambodia.  I feel a more embodied concept of how the body is used to influence and coerce people, how it can be a focal point of power relations, how our own understanding of ourselves is central to the understanding of the world we engage in.  The bodies that fill the graves in Cambodia are perfect examples of the manipulation of power using the body.  More than that, my understanding and views of the graves themselves has been altered through this visual approach to contemplation.  The CT scans offer a slice of my body in time and space; they represent a small, fragmented part of a much bigger whole, which each image hints at but none shows.  The graves that exist today in Cambodia are layered by years of living; each year as the rains come the layers move and elements of bodies begin to emerge before being hidden again – bone shards, small pieces of cloth – visible in part but hidden in whole and wholly incomprehensible if you do not know what lies beneath.  As I think about my own journey through my body, I also start to think about relationships with the graves; this ebb and flow of visuality that at once both offers power and voice to those skeletons whilst simultaneously removing it.  I don’t mean to be facile; I’m not trying to claim that my experience lends me any deep understanding of the graves, only that it has offered a new way of looking at them as they are manifested in everyday life.

I’m not sure exactly what the visuals of my own scans symbolise to me.  The losing of myself perhaps – the loss of control over myself, and the uninvited and uncontrollable agency of other people within my body.  The physicality of my interactions with the world.  The place of my body as a tool of communication, and as an embodiment of power relations.  The beautifully alien aesthetic of the body.  And the way that something that I know and own so intimately is also something from which I am completely disconnected.

Playing with Light

February 3, 2011

Siroccosky

Vodpod videos no longer available.

1st collector for Playing with Light
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Placement: Catching Lives Open Centre

November 12, 2010

Reuben Ross

As part of our course, we are required to engage with the local community by collaborating with a local organization and producing a multimedia document that will contribute to their concerns and issues. This is part of a move towards creating a more engaged, public anthropology based on reflexivity, collaboration and advocacy. So, after several weeks trying to find a good placement location, today was my first visit to the Canterbury Open Centre, run by the independent Canterbury-based charity, Catching Lives.

The Canterbury Open Centre is staffed entirely by volunteers and is open from 9am until 1pm, Monday-Friday, to provide a variety of facilities to the homeless of Canterbury. This includes breakfast and lunch, showers and access to donated clothing. They also provide a mental health clinic, as well as dentist and GP services. I thought this would be a fascinating place to do a multimedia project that will not only benefit me, but the organization itself.

And so, today, I visited the Canterbury Open Centre after it had closed to the public and was shown around the building by Terry, the Deputy Service Manager. I brought a still camera with me, so that I could take photos of the location itself (a similar exercise to what we did in Week 1 of the course). As anthropologist and linguist Stephen Feld writes, “as place is sensed, senses are placed; as places make sense, senses make place.” I thought that getting a sense of the place – minus the people – would allow me to better understand the people themselves. They would clearly have their own senses of place and their own attitudes, feelings and associations with the Canterbury Open Centre so, perhaps, getting my own sense of place would help me understand this. What’s more, Jean Rouch writes in The Camera and Man that “the ethnologist should spend quite a long time in the field before undertaking the least bit of filmmaking.” This particularly influenced me in my approach; although there are obvious time constraints to this project, I thought I should not rush into it and, instead, take time to better understand the subject matter. Taking a few simple photos of the Canterbury Open Centre today, I think, allows me to do this.

 

PHOTO3 PHOTO4

 

PHOTO6 PHOTO1

 

‘Seeing is deceiving’? Interesting article on sound in rock engravings

November 8, 2010

Siroccosky

I fell upon an article earlier which looks at the way rock engravings, far from being simple visual representations, have a far more sensual aspect to them, in which sound and feeling is as important as vision, at least within the San of Southern Africa.  It’s very interesting, and well worth a look:

Ouzman, S. (2001) ‘Seeing is deceiving: Rock Art and the Non Visual’  World Archaeology Vol 43(2) – Archaeology and Aesthetics (october 2001).  Pp 237 – 256.